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Amanshu*
Giggity Giggity goo
Mon 9th Jan '06 9:55AM
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General was bold enough to comment:


Diziet was bold enough to comment:

how come public schools aren't open to the public?



They are, just rich members of the public!



Bizarrely, that's pretty much the case - the term was originally to differentiate between schools that any member of the public could attend and which was usually sponsored by a guild, or monastry to train boys to a suitable level of education to learn a specific trade. This was in contrast to "private schools" which were usually run by their headmaster for their own trade and profit.



What bugs me is that they can be called public or private schools and it always means the same thing, that makes no sense!



Not always - not all private schools are public schools. Basically it's usually a matter of history whether a private school is a public school or not.
   

Gertrude
Landy Dirtlady
Wed 11th Jan '06 4:38PM
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When my Grandma says 'If you go outside with wet hair, you'll get a smelly nose,' WHAT DOES SHE MEAN??? I've tried asking her and she just looked a bit vague. Yet until I reached adulthood I truly believed that having a bath in the morning could lead to an untimely death.

More to the point, what's a smelly nose???

 

Spanners*
Misses his big brother :(
Wed 11th Jan '06 4:43PM
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Gertrude was bold enough to comment:
More to the point, what's a smelly nose???



Well if your nose wasn't smelly then how would you smell?

Anyone?

Anyone?

My nose is smelly, my ears are heary and my eyes are seeey
    

Gertrude
Landy Dirtlady
Wed 11th Jan '06 4:53PM
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Well yes, but why would that be affected by the wetness or otherwise of your hair? A smelly nose was always mentioned as a terrible consequence of lax hair-drying, so surely a nose that is smelly because it just smells isn't a smelly nose? Does that make any sense at all?
 

Diziet
optical moose
Wed 11th Jan '06 5:28PM
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a woman i work with always tells me not to sit on the wall outside while i'm disobeying corporate policy with impunity (having a fag) because i'll get a 'chin cough'. i think she means piles.

maybe your gran meant if you go outside with wet hair you'll get a cold.

or piles.

you can be underwhelmed and overwhelmed. is it possible to just be whelmed?

Tipper
Tipper has left the building
Fri 17th Feb '06 12:26PM
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Diziet was bold enough to comment:
you can be underwhelmed and overwhelmed. is it possible to just be whelmed?



whelm Pronunciation Key (hwlm, wlm)
tr.v. whelmed, whelm?ing, whelms

1. To cover with water; submerge.
2. To overwhelm.

So I'm guessing that to be whelmed is the same as overwhelmed then.

Is General the bloke I've seen in student tv archives somehow managing to jam along to Uchian playing a Bryan Adams "classic" on the organ?

General*
Windows Bob - the best!
Fri 17th Feb '06 12:40PM
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Tipper was bold enough to comment:

Is General the bloke I've seen in student tv archives somehow managing to jam along to Uchian playing a Bryan Adams "classic" on the organ?



Indeed I am.

The heavy metal version of sex on the beach is my personal fav.
    

Amanshu*
Giggity Giggity goo
Mon 3rd Apr '06 3:58PM
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Does anyone know the origins of toad-in-the-hole? I'm sure there's a very good reason that it talks about toads, but the best I can find is because the sausages poke out of the batter like toads poking their heads out of a hole.

I don't know about anyone else, but my toad in the hole doesn't look like toads poking their heads out of a hole. And anyway wouldn't it be toad in the pond rather than hole?
   

Malcolm*
My ape goosed a Bishop. Who are you?
Mon 3rd Apr '06 5:18PM
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I always used to wonder this, but a couple of years back I found a clue and looked further into it:

In times of plague & disease, people used to leave a huge boulder on the outskirts of the village. Traders would bring food and supplies and leave them for the villagers to collect, and in return villagers would leave coins in little hollows in the boulder, filled with water or vinegar to stop them carrying disease back to the traders. There are still examples of these all over the place. (If you live in York, there's one on the corner of Burton Stone Lane, in the wall outside the Burton Stone pub, and I think there's also one on Hob Moor on the path near Tadcaster Road.)

Anyway, there's a long tradition in Europe & Asia of frogs & toads being associated with wealth - you can by so-called "money toads", very ugly ornamental things that are supposed to bring good fortune to those who own them. I assume that's why people started referring to these coins, left in exchange for food, as "toads in the hole".

So, the dish is named after that, because the batter (kind of) resembles the smooth rock with things in it. And possibly, I imagine, because the sausage would have been the most luxurious part of it (=richness, wealth etc) so was associated with the other meaning of "toad".

Glad to be of service!
   

Swoop*
CHIMPO
Mon 3rd Apr '06 8:16PM
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That's a great answer. Where did the villages get the money though? Surely after a few weeks their coffers would run dry. I bet half those merhants ended up with chocolate money or shillings made of polished pigs toes.
My question is: What did they call Alice bands before Alice in Wonderland?
 

Diziet
optical moose
Tue 4th Apr '06 12:15AM
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Swoop was bold enough to comment:
That's a great answer. Where did the villages get the money though? Surely after a few weeks their coffers would run dry. I bet half those merhants ended up with chocolate money or shillings made of polished pigs toes.
My question is: What did they call Alice bands before Alice in Wonderland?



bands


Gertrude
Landy Dirtlady
Tue 11th Apr '06 6:30PM
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I'm really sad, and just looked that up. Actually, Alice wasn't depicted wearing a band in Wonderland, but in Alice Through the Looking Glass the band appears. Doesn't answer the question, but I feel smugger for this piece of knowledge anyway.
 

Diziet
optical moose
Fri 12th May '06 12:31AM
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why does Lurpak have 'spreadable' written on the side of the tub?

Spanners*
Misses his big brother :(
Tue 21st Nov '06 11:02AM
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When people refer to the 'seven seas' does anyone know which ones in particular does this encompass?
There are loads!
    

Amanshu*
Giggity Giggity goo
Tue 21st Nov '06 11:40AM
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It's because seven is a 'magic' number. I doubt there are seven actual seas it refers to - or if it does I'd imagine it changes with time and region. Humans have a need to categorise stuff and we seem to have a prefer certain numbers - 3, 7 and 13 being the main ones, and of course the 16th century just loved the number 4!

It's much like the colours of the rainbow. We know there are only three primary colours, and we know they mix to make three secondary colours. So at most there are 6 main colours in a rainbow (and varying shades between them) and yet most people still maintain there are only 7.

Same kind of thing here. The popularity and endurance of the phrase is probably due to it's combination of alliteration and sibilance.
   

General*
Windows Bob - the best!
Tue 21st Nov '06 12:26PM
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The answer I have heard is that the word seven used to be unterchangable with several.

The magic number 7 probably plays a part and all.
I have heard that Newton split up blue and indigo because he liked the idea of having seven colours.
If you are going on activation of the three types of colour receptor cells in the eye you get 9 colours (including black and white).
    

Diziet
optical moose
Tue 21st Nov '06 1:08PM
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General was bold enough to comment:
The answer I have heard is that the word seven used to be unterchangable with several.

The magic number 7 probably plays a part and all.
I have heard that Newton split up blue and indigo because he liked the idea of having seven colours.
If you are going on activation of the three types of colour receptor cells in the eye you get 9 colours (including black and white).



i'm reading Quicksilver by Neal Stephenson at the minute. that Isaac Newton was one crazy cat. he inserted things into his eye to test how light is reflected!


Feign
It's your time you're wasting!
Tue 21st Nov '06 1:48PM
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Diziet was bold enough to comment:

maybe your gran meant if you go outside with wet hair you'll get a cold.




I'm going with this - you see wet hair magnifies coldness making you more susceptible to getting a cold. When you get a cold your nose runs, and so you sniff a lot more than you normally would. When you smell something you sniff it, therefore wet hair equals a nose sniffing more than it normally would. A common way of expressing something is more than it was is by adding a "y" or "ey" to it, e.g. its more buttery, so your nose is smelling more (stuff) than it was, so its more smelly. Thus you have going outside with wet hair means you'll get a smelly nose.

I salute your grandma for condensing all that into such a snappy turn of phrase.


Incidentally, how do you turn a phrase? I've never held one to be able to.
 

Gertrude
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Tue 21st Nov '06 2:51PM
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Feign was bold enough to comment:


Diziet was bold enough to comment:

maybe your gran meant if you go outside with wet hair you'll get a cold.




I'm going with this - you see wet hair magnifies coldness making you more susceptible to getting a cold. When you get a cold your nose runs, and so you sniff a lot more than you normally would. When you smell something you sniff it, therefore wet hair equals a nose sniffing more than it normally would. A common way of expressing something is more than it was is by adding a "y" or "ey" to it, e.g. its more buttery, so your nose is smelling more (stuff) than it was, so its more smelly. Thus you have going outside with wet hair means you'll get a smelly nose.

I salute your grandma for condensing all that into such a snappy turn of phrase.


Incidentally, how do you turn a phrase? I've never held one to be able to.



Grab it by the scruff of its neck and scream in its face until it turns around.

Also, since my hairdryer expired last month, I've given up drying my hair, and have not noticed that my nose is any smellier than usual.
 

Demian*
Oh Lordy, Plegaleggole
Tue 21st Nov '06 5:32PM
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Are you sure she didn't say 'You'll get a sniffy nose'? I've heard that used to mean a cold
  

Feign
It's your time you're wasting!
Tue 21st Nov '06 5:59PM
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Gertrude was bold enough to comment:

Grab it by the scruff of it's neck and scream in its face until it turns around.




This is now my new approach to all grammar.
 

Ginger fury
i sing chaka khan songs while wearing my white stilettos
Tue 21st Nov '06 6:03PM
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Ohh it gives a whole new meaning to toad in the hole lol

http://www.peaklandheritage.org.uk/index.asp?peakkey=00900621


Gertrude
Landy Dirtlady
Tue 21st Nov '06 6:47PM
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Feign was bold enough to comment:


Gertrude was bold enough to comment:

Grab it by the scruff of its neck and scream in its face until it turns around.




This is now my new approach to all grammar.



And you can say that it was given to you by someone with a PhD in English. Well, in about two years time you'll be able to say that. If all goes according to plan...
 

Feign
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Tue 21st Nov '06 7:01PM
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Gertrude was bold enough to comment:

And you can say that it was given to you by someone with a PhD in English. Well, in about two years time you'll be able to say that. If all goes according to plan...



If your plan involves going around seizing everyone assessing your work with a vice-like grip and bellowing with rage into their face then I'm going to start saying the advice was given by someone with PhD in English right now.
 

Amanshu*
Giggity Giggity goo
Tue 21st Nov '06 7:07PM
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Apparently an Elephants night vision is as good as a humans.

How do they know that exactly?
   

General*
Windows Bob - the best!
Wed 25th Apr '07 12:00AM
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Me and the missus have been talking and we can't decide what would happen if you fell in a vat of oil and needed to swim to the side.

As oil is lighter than water and therefore lighter than you I would imagine that maintaining buoyancy would be pretty difficult.

This experiment suggests that the viscosity wouldn't make too much difference to your swimming speed: http://www.nature.com/news/2004/040920/pf/040920-2_pf.html

Any ideas?
    

Epicure_mammon
I'm not crazy cause I take the RIGHT pills :)
Wed 25th Apr '07 9:16AM
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Me and the missus have been talking and we can't decide what would happen if you fell in a vat of oil and needed to swim to the side.



This precise question came up in one of my final year fluid dynamics courses. The answer involved lots of horrid multivariate calculus and basically works out something like this:

1) The viscosity doesn't make a difference because the increase "grip" you have is cancelled out by it being harder to move forward
2) The decreased density, as well as affecting boyancy, also affects your ability to project yourself forward as you can displace push less mass backwards to provide your forward motion.
3) Its a bad idea cause you end up smelling like chips.
  

Emo Squid
sanctus, sanctus, sanctus
Wed 25th Apr '07 10:07AM
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Spanners was bold enough to comment:
When people refer to the 'seven seas' does anyone know which ones in particular does this encompass?
There are loads!



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seven_Seas

Mrsham
I lost my toes in a game of blackjack
Wed 25th Apr '07 10:27AM
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Emo Squid was bold enough to comment:


Spanners was bold enough to comment:
When people refer to the 'seven seas' does anyone know which ones in particular does this encompass?
There are loads!



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seven_Seas



Also:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seven_Seas_Of_Rhye

 

Diziet
optical moose
Wed 25th Apr '07 10:45AM
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Mrsham was bold enough to comment:


Emo Squid was bold enough to comment:


Spanners was bold enough to comment:
When people refer to the 'seven seas' does anyone know which ones in particular does this encompass?
There are loads!



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seven_Seas



Also:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seven_Seas_Of_Rhye





and lets not forget:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seven_Tears_%28song%29

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