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General*
Windows Bob - the best!
Thu 2nd Aug '07 4:38PM
4213 Posts
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Member Since
7th Apr '03
http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/2007/aug/02/3?gusrc=rss&feed=11

It is quite possible that it will only be of limited effectiveness but if the new process that they have created works well then a lot of people might be recovering from vegetative states.
This raises all sorts of questions not only about their quality of life when they wake up but also the huge guilt that is going to be felt by anyone who has allowed a ventilator to be switched off recently.

Time will tell if it is a cure all or a fluke, but its a pretty mind bending concept to imagine that someone who was to all intents and purposes dead for 5 years suddenly starts talking to people.
    

Amanshu*
Giggity Giggity goo
Sun 5th Aug '07 3:06AM
2708 Posts
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25th Aug '04


Joseph Giacino was bold enough to comment in a guardian article
After deep brain stimulation, we immediately saw some changes, literally within the first day,"



You forgot the issue that a major surgeon involved in such a discovery doesn't really understand the use of the word 'literally'.

However, as someone who has seen a friend in such a horrible state I'd welcome any movement towards a cure. Yes people who have made the choice to switch off a ventilator would feel horrible about it, but as I understand that article anyone who is at the stage when they need a ventilator is passed being able to receive this treatment.

I read it as only working on someone who has displayed basic signs of brain cognition as opposed to basic brain activity. The difference being someone who is only awake because of a machine and someone who appears to still have thought - even if it's pretty limited.

As for quality of life - well that's an even more iffy subject, if only because there are so many people who have benefited from advances in medical science. Right there you're verging on the question of if there is a time to say that someone will never have the same quality of life which anyone who is - for a want of a better word and fully accepting that English is really crap in this area - healthy will have.

I mean if you yourself lost the use of a major organ, a leg, an arm, an eye, etc. would you honestly be able to say you have a lower quality of life or would you have to say that current society has a concept of what life should be and is geared towards it?
   

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