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Kelly*
Poke me in the knees and call me Roger
Tue 9th Oct '07 2:13PM
758 Posts
Kelly's Avatar
Member Since
4th Oct '03
I've got wireless internet at work, and despite several attempts at setting security up for it, I've just found out that my laptop connects to it automatically, without entering any password, and says it's not secured.

I tried to escure it by putting a WEP code in (that's what I think I did - the kind of security I used was definitely that one on the basis that I had no idea what the WPA security bit wanted from me). There is space to write 4 codes but I assumed one would be enough. Basically I've got no idea what I'm doing, and thought I'd ask you before someone starts downloading something illegal on it and I have to go to prison.
   

Agentgonzo
There's no pee in catheter!
Tue 9th Oct '07 3:48PM
811 Posts
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Member Since
8th Aug '06
WEP is basically considered to be insecure (you can break it in a matter of minutes), so WPA is better to use. Having said that, I've never used WPA, so can't really tell you how to set it up.

With WEP, you only need to put in one code (they normally have 4 codes so that you can swap them around for some reason if you want to - I have no idea why this would be useful though). If you get a choice, choose the highest common encryption that is common to your machine and the wifi point (512bit > 256bit > 128bit etc).

After that, it should pretty much work when you enter the password into your machine.

A useful thing to enter in is MAC filtering. Each network card has a unique address burnt into it that it uses to communicate. It's 48 bit address normally written as xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx etc. You can tell your router to only accept traffic from those network cards listed. If you connect to your wifi router through the management software you can normally list what MAC addresses are allowed to connect. It will also probably have list recent connections which should have your computer's MAC address that you can add. If you can't find it out that way, go to your machine (I'll assume that you're running windows) and go Start --> Run -- cmd.exe.

Type in:
ipconfig /all

this will print a load of information about each of your network adapters. You want the wireless one. The important listing is the Physical Address, which is your MAC address.
  

General*
Windows Bob - the best!
Tue 9th Oct '07 11:48PM
4213 Posts
General's Avatar
Member Since
7th Apr '03
Whilst agreeing with what Gonzo says in theory, I would stick with 64bit WEP encryption. It is less secure, but it is the encryption that the most things are compatible with and basically people are going to either sponge some free WiFi, or give up and find some other sucker. Unless you think people are going to make a real effort to hack you and thieve your data then any kind of encryption is fine.

Do you know how to get to the configuration page?

Most wireless routers have a web interface that lets you configure them.

For example on a BT Homehub it is: http://bthomehub.home/

You will need to have a look in the manual for your router to see the address you need to use.
    

Kelly*
Poke me in the knees and call me Roger
Wed 10th Oct '07 11:01AM
758 Posts
Kelly's Avatar
Member Since
4th Oct '03
Thank you both very much!

I can get to the page fine, and I've tried several times to type in a WEP key - the problem is, despite the page saying encription is turned on, no other devices recognise that it is, and so can pick up wireless - basicallym the problem seems to be that it's saying WEP security is turned on at the control page but this seems to have no effect on whether there is any security.
   

Malcolm*
My ape goosed a Bishop. Who are you?
Thu 11th Oct '07 2:31PM
1673 Posts
Malcolm's Avatar
Member Since
3rd Jun '03
Hmm, I see your problem, Kelly, and it's an odd one.

One thing that used to happen with a router we had was: you go to the security page, choose the type of encryption, passwords and everything else, and it all gets saved. But all you've done is tell it what settings it would use if security were turned on. Sometimes the actual command to tell it to use security is a different thing again, sometimes even on a different page.

Tell you what, can you tell us the make and model number of the wireless router and we can have a look for a manual on the internet?
   

Joshtbw
Now with added toes
Sun 23rd Dec '07 6:52PM
8 Posts
Member Since
23rd Dec '07


Kelly was bold enough to comment:
Thank you both very much!

I can get to the page fine, and I've tried several times to type in a WEP key - the problem is, despite the page saying encription is turned on, no other devices recognise that it is, and so can pick up wireless - basicallym the problem seems to be that it's saying WEP security is turned on at the control page but this seems to have no effect on whether there is any security.



Sometimes you have to reboot the thing to get it to work, just pressing save sometimes isn't enough to get it thought the thick skulls of some routers (esp that homehub one). The other option is to make a closed network which won't broadcast your SSID (network name) to all and sundry. Its not as secure as WEP/WPA, but it doesn't sound like security is a huge issue for you.
  

Demian*
Oh Lordy, Plegaleggole
Mon 24th Dec '07 10:45AM
4678 Posts
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Member Since
7th Apr '03
^^ Welcome to the forums, Josh!


  

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