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A very easy question about a network router - 1 to 6
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Malcolm*
My ape goosed a Bishop. Who are you?
Tue 18th Dec '07 10:17AM
1673 Posts
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Member Since
3rd Jun '03
Morning folks,

Just a really quick thing - I'm pretty sure I know the answer but would appreciate confirmation before I spend anything!

Our broadband router (a BT Home Hub) has two network sockets. Don't get me started about wireless - it's rubbish in our house, as I've often said before. (Although my latest theory is that it may be our wireless transmitting central heating thermostat that's causing the problem - any opinions about that? Anyway, I digress.)

The router has 2 sockets and I need 3. Am I right in thinking that all I need to do is buy a little 10 hub thing, plug it into one of the sockets and hey presto, I've got several more functioning network sockets?

Any advice welcome!
   

General*
Windows Bob - the best!
Tue 18th Dec '07 10:30AM
4213 Posts
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Member Since
7th Apr '03
Yeah pretty much.

Someone's overly elaborate Christmas lights have stopped my Wi-Fi working.

Grrr
    

Oooood
Aubergine Mincemeat
Tue 18th Dec '07 1:34PM
242 Posts
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Member Since
15th Apr '03
if you're going to have a lot of traffic on the network buy a switch instead but yeah, a hub's fine, your router will still handle all the IP address assignment.
 

Malcolm*
My ape goosed a Bishop. Who are you?
Tue 18th Dec '07 2:19PM
1673 Posts
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Member Since
3rd Jun '03
Excellent - thanks folks!
   

Agentgonzo
There's no pee in catheter!
Wed 19th Dec '07 11:58AM
811 Posts
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Member Since
8th Aug '06
It's very hard to buy a hub these days. Most things that you'd consider to be a hub are in fact switches. Go to your local high street shop and buy a 5 or 8 port jobby.

One thing worth mentioning though would be that when you come to install it, there is normally a dedicated uplink port (marked as such) and then ports numbered 1-n. Usually (not always though) the uplink port is linked to port 1 or n, meaning that you can't use both at the same time - if so, there is normally a mark or line to indicate this. The uplink should go to the router and all the other ones to wherever, but most things are smart enough to just be able to use any port. However, if you use the uplink, it disables port 1 (or n). Watch out for this one, it confused me for ages once.
  

Malcolm*
My ape goosed a Bishop. Who are you?
Wed 19th Dec '07 12:00PM
1673 Posts
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Member Since
3rd Jun '03
Yep, that's the impression I've got about hub/switches. Anything I found on dabs.com when looking for a "hub" was in fact a switch. But that's an excellent tip about the uplink port, Gonzo - I can well imagine spending hours trying to find an answer to that on the internet before completely giving up. Thanks!
   

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